Completed Projects


Research Project 4

Molecular Mechanisms of RSV F Activation and Inhibition

Jason McLellan, PhD

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory tract infections that result in substantial morbidity and mortality in infants and the elderly. RSV entry into host cells is facilitated by an attachment protein (G) and a fusion protein (F) that in its active form adopts a metastable prefusion conformation. After attachment of RSV to cells, it is hypothesized that host-factors trigger the conformational rearrangement of F that results in fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. The prefusion conformation of F is therefore considered an ideal vaccine antigen, and antibodies and small molecules that disrupt its structure and function are actively being pursued. Development of effective therapeutics will be greatly enhanced by a molecular understanding of how the F glycoprotein interacts with host-cell factors to promote entry, and how neutralizing antibodies inhibit one or more steps in the entry process. For this project, we will test two hypotheses: first, that specific host-cell factors enhance the rate of RSV F triggering; and second, that the most potent neutralizing antibodies target receptor-binding sites and block conformational changes. We expect that the results from these studies will fill important gaps in our understanding of RSV entry and provide a molecular basis for RSV F activation and inhibition.

Schematic of RSV F-mediated membrane fusion. Host-cell factors promote entry, whereas neutralizing monoclonal antibodies block the function of RSV F.

Schematic of RSV F-mediated membrane fusion. Host-cell factors promote entry, whereas neutralizing monoclonal antibodies block the function of RSV F.


A computationally-designed inhibitor molecule (gray) interacts snuggly with its target domain (yellow) to prevent cancer-promoting activities.

A computationally-designed inhibitor molecule (gray) interacts snuggly with its target domain (yellow) to prevent cancer-promoting activities.

Research Project 3

Protein Design for Selective Interference with LPA Signaling in Colon Cancer

Gevorg Grigoryan, PhD

Colorectal cancer was the third-most common cause of deaths from cancer in the United States in 2013. This disease claims over 50,000 lives and afflicts over 140,000 people annually in the US, underscoring a clear and urgent need for better control of this incurable malignancy. The goal of our study is to attenuate oncogenic activities in colon cancer cells by inhibiting a key proliferatory signaling pathway mediated by the powerful mitogen lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Key towards this goal is to produce selective inhibitors—molecules that interact with and inhibit specific proteins in the cell, while avoiding any unintended side-interactions with other proteins. We are uniquely capable of providing such selectivity using computational technologies we have developed that enable us to target selectively a single member in a family of closely related protein domains.