Scientific projects at the interface of discovery and disease


Experimental strategy for the identification of mTORC1 and 2 substrates in Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines and tumors using quantitative multiplex mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics.

Experimental strategy for the identification of mTORC1 and 2 substrates in Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines and tumors using quantitative multiplex mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics.

Research Project 1

Proteomic Approaches to Target the PP6-mTORC2 Pathway in Glioblastoma

Arminja Kettenbach, PhD

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive tumor of the central nervous system in adults and it is generally fatal within 12 months of diagnosis. We propose to identify targets in the newly uncovered and frequently overexpressed PP6-mTORC2 pathway for the development of new therapeutic strategies to fight this devastating disease. 


Research Project 2

Identifying Mitophagy Receptors as Targets in Ras-dysregulated Cells

Michael Ragusa, PhD

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal and challenging cancers to treat in the United States. The growth of PDAC tumors is dependent on a cellular degradation process, termed autophagy. We are combining biochemical and cellular approaches to uncover the role of autophagy in PDAC.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae were stained with MitoTracker Red CMXRos and imaged using a Zeiss LSM 880 with Airyscan to monitor mitochondrial dynamics.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae were stained with MitoTracker Red CMXRos and imaged using a Zeiss LSM 880 with Airyscan to monitor mitochondrial dynamics.


Research Project 4

Electrogenic Modulation of Signal Decoding in Presynaptic Terminals

Michael Hoppa, DPhil

The generation and transmission of electrical signals is fundamental to initiating the release of neurotransmitters in the nervous system. This proposal will take advantage of a number of novel optical approaches to determine the molecular mechanisms that regulate electrical signalling in nerve terminals and define their impact on neurotransmission. Compromised neurotransmission is a known or suspected defect in several neurological diseases, thus a better understanding electrical signaling in nerve terminals could suggest new therapeutic approaches.

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